It’s Not You, It’s Me: Branded Experiences | The Recap 10/30

Guinness Store
Guinness Store

You’ve made it through the week, congrats! Before you power down, take a gander at this week’s stories we thought were most interesting.Digital Travel Marketing This Week: Creating Branded DestinationsExperiential marketing isn't a novel idea, but big-named companies are taking these offline experiences to new heights. Not only is their goal to entertain consumers but hopefully build loyalty with them. Millennials, in particular, are seeking out these 'experiences' versus buying 'things.' This sentiment is reflected in Eventbrite’s recent survey that find this group (82%) attending or participating in "a variety of live experiences in the past year, ranging from parties, concerts, festivals, performing arts and races and themed sports—and more so than other older generations (70%)."

If you've ever visited the World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta (a must-see if you're in the area; you can sample over 100 flavors!) or the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin, they're a sight to see and behold. Though I will admit that my visits felt more like a Disneyland ride than how they describe it to be. Despite the fact that I sauntered along sans a tour guide, every 'experience' I tried (pouring a cold one) was too calculated. Brands will need to find a good balance between authenticity and efficiency.

Personal Branding is Not About YouPersonal branding does not only require being visible to decision makers and influencers, but also most importantly to demonstrate your value to others. Have you made your contribution to set a foundation for a strong, enduring personal brand? Are you doing work to make others more successful? Personal branding consultant, William Arruda, dives in more in this Forbes article.

ICYMI: Articles and Other Curious Things

Halloween
Halloween

If ghosts and ghoulish things don’t make you quiver, this might do the trick: Facebook Search is now universal. That means, those skeletons meant to be kept in the closet might be available for public consumption. This Wired article can help you check your privacy settings.

The low key marketing strategy behind Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt’s ‘By the Sea’ is a calculated move. Jolie’s camp says the film is “an intimate character study evocative of films from ’70s-era European cinema, and we wanted to consistently present that idea in the advertising with integrity rather than misleading the audience.”

News from China: "PR does not mean ‘public relations’ but rather ‘pay the reporter.’ For Chinese firms to enter a new market, they either stay silent or let the local media, politicians and general public shape their image."