The Importance of Consistency on Social Media

There’s a lot that goes into developing and executing social media strategies. Each platform is unique, which means that the content published to each should not be exactly the same across all channels. The followers that are found on Twitter are vastly different than the followers found on Instagram or Pinterest, meaning it is important that companies understand how to create strategies that will resonate with each specific audience.

 

Creating a social media strategy is only the first half of the process. Execution of the strategy is just as, if not more, important than the creation. A plan is useless if it is developed and then sits as an untouched file in the memory of a computer. To generate engagement and increase awareness of a company on social, the plan must be put in motion.

 

A common struggle I have seen as a marketer is watching a strategy be developed, begin execution successfully, but then fizzle out within a month or even a few weeks. Social media, especially when it comes to gaining followers, is a long-game strategy. More often than not, a company will not see a dramatic spike in followers simply because it posts once in a blue moon. To see the impact of a social strategy, maintaining a consistent posting schedule is the key.

 

Depending upon the company and industry, the frequency of posting can vary greatly. While some organizations will find that posting daily to just Twitter and Facebook is enough, others will see more value in posting twice a day on Pinterest and Instagram. For others, posting just three or two times in a single week will suffice. When it comes to posting schedules, it is best to default back to the findings used to create the social media strategy, and then execute the plan according to audience activity on each platform based on the organization’s industry.

 

At its core, the best advice for social is to remember that organizations need to post on at least a weekly basis. Otherwise, a company runs the risk of losing followers, or worse, the followers that do follow the organization forget it even exists.

 

Remember that those who follow a company on social media choose to do so for a reason. They like what is being posted or they want to know more about what it is the company does and what it stands for. Creating a posting schedule is a small part of a social strategy, because the timing of when those posts should appear are equally as important. I wrote a previous blog post about this very subject that you can use as a guide.

 

People want to engage with the organizations that they feel connected to. By posting consistently, you can build not only your follower count, but also the connection you have with those who use your product or service.